Presentation @ Digital Existence II: Precarious Media Life

Later this month I will be presenting at Digital Existence II: Precarious Media Life, at the Sigtuna Foundation, Sweden, organised by Amanda Lagerkvist via the DIGMEX Research Network (of which I am a part) and the Nordic Network for the Study of Media and Religion. The abstract for my part of the show:

 

On the terror of becoming known

Today, we keenly feel the terror of becoming known: of being predicted and determined by data-driven surveillance systems. The webs of significance which sustain us also produce persistent vulnerability to becoming known by things other than ourselves. From the efforts to predict ‘Lone Wolf’ terrorists through comprehensive personal communications surveillance, to pilot programs for calculating insurance premiums by monitoring daily behaviour, the expressed fear is often of misidentification and misunderstanding. Yet the more general root of this anxiety is not of error or falsehood, but a highly entrenched moralisation of knowing. Digital technologies are the newest frontier for the reprisal of old Enlightenment dreams, wherein the subject has a duty to know and technological inventions are an ineluctable force for better knowledge. This nexus demands and requires subjects’ constant vulnerability to producing data and being socially determined by it. In turn, subjects turn to what Foucault called illegalisms[1]: forms of complaint, compromise, obfuscation, and other everyday efforts to mitigate the violence of becoming known. The presentation threads this normative argument with two kinds of grounding material: (1) episodes in becoming-known drawn from original research into American state- and self-surveillance, and (2) select works in moral philosophy and technology criticism.[2]

 

[1] Foucault, M., 2015. The Punitive Society: Lectures at the College de France 1972-1973 B. E. Harcourt, ed., New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

[2] E.g. Jasanoff, S., 2016. The Ethics of Invention: Technology and the Human Future, New York: W.W. Norton & Co; Vallor, S., 2016. Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting, Oxford: Oxford University Press; Winner, L., 1986. The Whale and the Reactor: A Search for Limits in an Age of High Technology, Chicago: Chicago University Press.

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